Monday, September 18, 2017


Another shawl made from one skein of yarn I bought at the 2017 Carolina Fiber Fest. The yarn is hand-dyed 100% superwash merino wool in 1-ply fingering weight from Iria Yarn Company out of Raleigh, NC. The colorway is "Boho."

The pattern is "Close to You" by Justyna Lorkowska. It's available as a free download on Ravelry at http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/close-to-you



Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Keeping Busy

Not much to post these days as I am busy working on my ELEVEN! North Carolina State Fair fiber entries, and I don't like to post photos of them until they've been entered in the fair. It remains to be seen if I will be able to complete pieces for all the categories in time, but with several weeks before the fair opens in October, I'm working hard to get things done.

I got a happy surprise this week when I visited the Lace Knitting Facebook group. One of the photos of my butterfly scarf was used as the group's page banner. I had no idea that they would feature the scarf since it is not as lacy as most of the pieces on the page.

Despite all the activity devoted to the fair, I've also signed up to participate in a gigantic art installation Love Across the USA - Raleigh. Dozens of participants will be crocheting 2' by 2' squares that will be assembled into a huge mural that will be installed on the Raleigh convention center in October. It will be the third mural in the series planned by Olek, the artist designing and managing the project.

The design (portrait and quotation) will not be revealed until the mural is installed. The first two murals were Harriet Tubman and Susan B. Anthony in Rochester, NY. I finished my assigned square quickly so I could get back to my fair projects.

Friday, July 28, 2017

June 2017 Knitting: "Butterfly" Scarf


This was an interesting and, for me, a challenging project: each ruffle is knitted on top of the previous ruffle. The last row of stitches of the previous ruffle are knit together with the next ruffle that has been formed...and so on till one side of the scarf is finished. After the second half is finished, the halves are joined together. 


The yarn is Jojoland Melody Superwash in 100% wool in colorway "Lilac Rose." The pattern is "Butterflies Are Free" from Lace One-Skein Wonders edited by Judith Durant (Storey Publishing, 2013, ISBN: 978-1612120584). 

The pattern calls for 700 yards of yarn, but I didn't have that much in my stash. After a bit of measuring and weighing I made some adjustments to accommodate the amount of yarn I did have. Each ruffle is supposed to have 3 repeats of the charted pattern, but I did only 2 repeats. Each side is supposed to have 9 ruffles, but I only have 8 ruffles per side. With these changes I did not run out of yarn, and I think the final result looks fine.


June 2017 Knitting: Lacy Hand-dyed Yarn Shawl


Another shawl made with yarn I bought at the 2017 Carolina Fiber Fest. The yarn is hand-dyed from Iria Yarn Company out of Raleigh, NC. The fiber is a 2-ply lace weight, 60% suri alpaca, 40% merino wool in colorway "Raspberry."


The pattern is "Magenta Mohair Lace Stole" from Lace One-Skein Wonders edited by Judith Durant (Storey Publishing, 2013, ISBN: 978-1612120584).


Monday, July 24, 2017

Latest Blinged Tatting Shuttles


Here's what I've been playing with lately: Bling on a Roll. The "jewels" are attached to a clear strip of sticky tape. You just cut the length you need and attach to the shuttle. I then applied clear protective coats to secure everything.

I bought Bling on a Roll at AC Moore in the scrapbooking department. For a person who does not scrapbook, I sure buy a lot of supplies there.



Here's some closer views of the shuttles


It was hard to get a good shot of the pink one; it looks much better in real life.




Thursday, July 13, 2017

June Knitting 2017: Tote Bags

I've been knitting up a storm this summer and neglecting recording the results here in my blog. So I'll try to remedy this in a series of postings. First are two tote bags I knitted, one for myself and one for my sister after she saw the first one.



The one on the left is knit from yarn I bought at Downtown Knits in Apex, NC, at the Spring Yarn Crawl. After my sister said she'd love one I went back for another cone. As you can see they're both black and white (the colorway is called "TV Static"), but due to the source of the yarn there are always variations. 

The yarn is Wool and the Gang's "Jersey Be Good" T-shirt yarn made from factory offcuts. 


The pattern is called "Zigzag Shopper" and is also from Wool and the Gang. It's knit on size 19 needles so it knits up very fast. The resulting piece is rather heavy so I don't think it would be comfortable in a garment. Years ago I knit my daughter a T-shirt out of T-shirt yarn and she found it much too bulky and heavy to wear. (It probably ended up as a charity shop donation.)

Because of the source for this yarn, it apparently does not have the uniformity of most yarns. One thing I noticed when I started the second bag was that the yarn on that cone was wider than the yarn on the first cone, making a much thicker fabric. I was concerned that I would run out of yarn because the cones are measured by weight, not yardage. Rather than risk having to buy yet another cone to finish what is supposed to be a one-cone project, I took scissors to the yarn and split it into two narrower bands. As a result, I have the equivalent of a third cone still in my stash for a later project.


Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Off the Needles: Eifelgold Shawl




One of my purchases at this year's Carolina Fiber Fest was a kit for knitting Eifelgold, a shawl that has been a popular knit-along project in this area.




The kit included the pattern and 2 skeins of fingering weight superwash merino yarn from The Fibre Studio, out of Charlotte, NC, The main color is 5 ounces in "Noir" and the contrasting color is 3 ounces of "Holly."

The pattern is made up of solid-color areas of garter stitch and two-color areas of a slip-stitch or mosaic stitch, easy knitting since mosaic stitch (unlike fair isle) requires only one color to be carried along a row. 

I did have a bit of trouble getting started: you begin by casting on 8 stitches and make increases on right-side rows. I kept messing up my count in the first 7 or 8 rows partly because the yarn plies split a little and partly because it was hard to see the stitches in the black yarn. I had just about given up hope of getting going with the project when I went to a film class where another knitter had brought her almost-finished Eifelgold shawl. I was dumbfounded at her progress since it was only a week after the Fiber Fest. But she told me that she didn't get the yarn at the festival; it was from a knit-along at one of the local yarn shops and she had been knitting it for several weeks. 

Inspired by her progress, I went home determined that before the end of our class I would have the shawl done and ready to show her my version. And 3 weeks later I had finished all but the blocking. I can't say there weren't still a lot of rows that I had to frog and reknit because of losing a stitch, but overall it was a very satisfying project. It has been a lot of years since I had done any mosaic knit patterns, so it was nice to know that they still give me knitting pleasure.